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Monday-Sunday

9:30am 'till late

 

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ADDRESS

25 Dignan Street

Pt Chevalier

Auckland 1022

T: 09 846 6728

E: PtChevBowls@gmail.com

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Pt Chevalier Bowls Playing Etiquette

There is little doubt that one of the greatest attributes of the game of ‘lawn bowls’ is the opportunity it gives to foster camaraderie and sociability amongst fellow bowlers. It is important that the conventional courtesies and standards of etiquette be observed on the greens as well as in the pavilion.

 

It is courteous...
  • In a singles match when your opponent has won the previous end to hand them the mat and jack

  • When the match is completed to thank the marker and to congratulate your opponent

  • To stand still and behind the bowler when they are delivering a bowl

  • When playing at home and as hosts to make visiting players welcome

  • When your team loses to congratulate your opponents

  • Never to use strong language during play or display signs of ill-temper

  • To commend a good shot played by your opponent.

 

Sportsmanship costs nothing, and adds to the enjoyment of the game.
  • When changing ends keep within the confines of your rink

  • After the delivery of your bowl to remain within the confines of your rink

  • That all players on or behind the head refrain from any movement that will distract the player at the other end when they are delivering their bowl

  • Not to criticise the effort of a fellow team member. They are trying just as hard as you are.

  • Not to blame the condition of the green for your team’s defeat, and especially not in front of a member of another club.

 

A Second’s duty is to mark the scoreboard and maintain the correct score.

 

A Third should not offer advice to their skip unless called upon to do so and unless the position of the bowls has altered after the skip has left the head.

 

A Skip should remember that they have been chosen to lead and encourage and not become so engrossed in conversation with their opposing skip that they forget their function. A skip should never, by word, grimace or action, show displeasure when a bad bowl is delivered by any member of their team. They are as likely to do the same themselves.